E 0679          PERID

The Old Saxon word " perid " is of Germanic origin.

H 0721            ש ר פ

Concept of root : horse and rider

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ש ר פ

parash

 saddle horse; horseman

Related English words

Old Saxon : perid

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ש ר פ

parash

saddle horse;

horseman

p . r . sh

Old Saxon

perid

horse

p . r . d

German

Pferd

pférd

horse

p . r . d

Dutch

paard

paard

horse

p . r . d

 

 

Proto-Semitic *PARASH --- *PĒRD Indo-European

 

 

This entry is related to number E 0678 (Hebrew 0710), where we see the Hebrew root "P R D" with the meaning of "tamed equine" . The European words are Old Saxon " perid ", German "Pferd" and Dutch "paard".

 

In this case a diversification has taken place in Hebrew. Instead of a D, here " SH " is added to indicate that the equine is saddled to be ridden. And the same word is also used to define the rider himself. Perhaps the most original meaning is that of the combination "horse and rider" as we would read it in Exodus, when the Pharao with his "cavalry" comes in pursuit towards the Red Sea.

 

Equines were in theStone Age among those important big animals living in the wild and their name was based on the combination P R that was used as well for other wild animals. Obviously all animals were wild before domestication started. And the horse was originally hunted for its good meat. An equine was called a "per’é", a bovine a "par" with female "parŕ". See entries E 0081 (Hebrew 0707) , E 0102 ( Hebrew 0706), E 0322 (Hebrew 0703) and E 0330 (Hebrew 0704).

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic is considered as having had the same root of this Hebrew word. It is seen in Aramaic and Syriac "פ ר ש א , parashŕ = horse" and in Syriac, pronounced "perashŕ" and saying also "horseman", for which Aramaic uses "פ ר ש , parash". Arabic and Ethiopian both have faras = horse", in which the original "P" has become "PH = F" and the final consonant is "S", not "SH". In Ethiopian "faras" is used " for both "horse" and "horseman". Arabic distinguishes between "faras = horse" and "fāris = horseman".

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic and Indo-European. Werefer to entry E 0678 (Hebrew 0710) and repeat the concluding notes:

     

    Note:
    • Proto-Germanic. On the basis of the reasons explained in the above text, probably Proto-Germanic had a form "P Ē RD", though this may as well have been "P Ā RD" .

     

    Note:
    • Indo-European. On the basis of the similarity between Latin and Proto-Germanic, Indo-European may have had a form "P Ē RD". There is additional but uncertain information for this:

       

      Celtic has a Cymric "gorwydd and a hypothetical but probable Gaulish "*voredus", both with the meaning "horse".

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 20/11/2012 at 11.19.40