E 0661 PALESTRA

The word " palestra " is, via Latin, of Greek origin

H 0688 ג ל פ

Concept of root : opposition

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ג ל פ

palag

to divide, to oppose against

Related English words

palestra

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ג ל פ

palag

to divide

to oppose against

p . l . g

Greek

παλαιω ;

-

-

παλαιστρα

palaio ;

-

-

palaistra

to be opposed against ;

palestra

p . l .

Latin

palaestra

palestra

palestra

p . l

English

palestra

palestra

p . l

 

 

Proto-Semitic *PALAG --- *PALAI-O Greek

 

 

This similarity has the problem of various others, that is it exists between the European root as such and the first two consonants of the Hebrew root. Unless one may suppose that the Greek " I " in "palai" has developed out of an earlier " G " in a "*palag", which is not impossible. Further there are good indications that the basic meaning of " to split, divide, disrupt" must have been carried in Hebrew or in Semitic by the two consonant unit "*P . L .":

 

Note:
  • Hebrew. This root "P L G" covers the situation of opposition as well as that of dividing. Opponents are divided by something, either physical or mental. In Genesis 10:25 the name of Peleg, son of Eber, is explained as follows : "for in his days the earth was divided", which suggests an opposition between the two parts.

     

    Dividing physically is the subject of our root "P L G", but also of two other rather similar roots : "פ ל ח, P L GH ", as well as " פ ל ה, P L (H)", that says "to separate". It refers a.o. to the contrast between Egyptians and Hebrews during the plagues.

     

    With the root "P L G" there is also the word of Aramaic origin "פ ל ג א ה, palĕga' = disputant, quarrelsome person", as well as Aramaic " פ ל ג א ן, palĕgan = opponent, contender", that brings us into the field of Greek "palaio".

 

Note:
  • Greek. This verb "palaio" covers the situations in which one is opposed to somebody else or to something. No etymology has been established. The similarity with the two-consonant element "P L" in Hebrew is rather evident and the third consonant " Y " might even have developed out of an earlier " G ". This is just a wild guess of course as Greek, different from for example English, does not seem to have a habit of changing many " G "'s in " Y "'s.

 

Note:
  • English. The English participation in this similarity with Hebrew is , as so often, limited to a loanword from Greek . A palestra is the place where opponents meet, though today the use is more concentrated on personal training. The concept was typically related to the classic Greek concept of sports and competition . The Romans took over the concept and its name . Today a "palestra" is known in many tongues .

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. This root is found in Phoenician " פ ל ג = to divide", as well as in Aramaic and Syriac " פ ל ג , pelag = he split, divided". Arabic "falaja = he split, divided" has the usual developments of an initial "P" becoming "PH = F" and the "G" becoming " J ". This root probably was used in Proto-Semitic : "* פ ל ג , P L G".

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 29/12/2012 at 9.55.50