E 0044 ARABLE

The word "arable" is of Latin origin .

H 0675 ר י נ

Concept of root : ploughing

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ר י נ

nayar

to break up new land;

to plough

Related English words

arable

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ר י נ

nayar

to break up new land

to plough

n y r <

(a) r

Greek

αροω

aroo

to plough

(a) r (o)

Latin

arare

arare

to plough

(a) r

English

arable

arable

(a) r

 

 

Proto-Semitic *NAYAR < *AR --- *ĀR Indo-European

 

 

The basic meaning of this Hebrew root is that of "to break up land, till land for the first time. That means that new land is made arable, which is expressed by this special verb. In modern Hebrew the verb for "arare" has been contracted into " נ ר , nar ". But the older verb "nayar" was composed of a prefix N and a older root of two consonants. The meaning of "first tilling" was a clear justification of the use of the prefix. The older root may have been either "* ו ר , W R", pronounced "war", or more probably "* א ר , ar ". This is found in words indicating the earth and it is identical to the basis of Latin "arare". As we know, in this Latin verb the first part "ar-" is the root, and the second part "-are" is the suffix of the infinitive form. See for Hebrew "AR-" entry E 0283 (Hebrew 0068).

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. This root is also seen in Aramaic and Syriac " נ י ר א, nir' = newly broken land". Akkadian "nīru" has the same message. The root may well have been in use already in Proto-Semitic. "* נ י ר , N Y R." With reference to the previous paragraph there is the probability of the earlier root without the prefix " N " : "* א ר, 'ar ".

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. Latin "arare" and Greek "aroo" both have an original "A R-.

     

    Armenian also has "A R-" in "araur = plough"

     

    Celtic shows Middle Irish "airim = plow" and Cymric "arddu = to plow", with "A R-"

     

    Baltic has Latvian "aru = to plow" and Lithuanian "ariù = plow, with "A R-"

     

    Germanic with Gothic "arjan and Old Norse "erja, both saying "to plow", with Old High German "art = plowed land" and "ardon, arton = to cultivate the land" also indicate an original "A R-

     

    "Slavic with Russian " о р а т ь, oratj = to plow, till", that has a number of related words, gives "O R-, that finds confirmation in Old Church Slavonic "orja and in other Slavic tongues.

     

    Indo-European probably had "Ā R-.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 15/11/2012 at 14.05.36