E 0758ááááááááá (TO)á SAVE

The verb " to save " is, via Old French, of Latin origin .

H 0665áááááááá ל צ נ

Concept of root : saving

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ל צ נ;

ל צ נ;

ל צ ה

nitsÓl;

nitsŔl;

hitsýl

to be saved;

to save;

to save

Related English words

save

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ל צ נ;

-

ל צ נ;

ל צ ה

nitsÓl;

-

nitsŔl;

hitsýl

to be saved;

to save;

to save

n . ts . l

< * ts . l

Latin

salvare

salvare

to save

s . l v

Old French

salver >

sauver

salvÚ ; >

sovÚ

to save

s . l v >

s . (u) v

Middle English

salven > saven

to save

s . l v >

s . v

English

to save

to save

s . v

 

 

Proto-Semitic *NATSAL < *TSAL --- *SĂL-V-US Latin

 

 

There are three differences. The first one, the initial N in "nitsÓl", that represents a confirming prefix, as shown in the note on Hebrew. The second one shows us Latin S versus Hebrew TS. There are many instances in many tongues, where an S is pronounced TS. Speakers of Italian in the central and southern parts of the country do so regularly, and not just in speaking dialects. Thirdly, Latin has a V or originally U, like a Hebrew Waw, as a third consonant. This lacks in Hebrew. And roots with some related meaning do not have "TS L W", but "SH L W".

 

Note:
  • Hebrew seems to have some complications in the choice of verbs on the basis of "N TS L". First, the basic form "natsal" is not found. Secondly, two not identical developments are discernable. These are "to save" or "to free (from peril)" with the intensive form "nitsal" and "to take away, steal " with the intensive form "nitsŔl". Both are expression of an action of taking away, either a person or an object, from a certain place where it is stuck or held.

     

    We mention another verb that has TS and L, but lacks the initial N. Instead it has an א , Aleph : " א צ ל, atsal ", that also says "to carry off, put away". This is sufficient evidence to establish that the two-consonant combination "TS L" in itself , also without an initial N, carries the message of this entry and was in use earlier: " צ ל, TS . L ".

     

    Besides the above mentioned intensive forms, there is a passive form of "natsal", also "nitsÓl" for "to be saved, free oneself (from peril)".

     

    This last verb, on the basis of a root "N TS L" should have been "*nintsal". We do not suppose that two N’s one after the other have led to the absorption of one, but that the extended root "N TS L" has not conquered all verbal forms of original "*TS L". This is seen also in the causative form "hitsil" that otherwise should have been "*hinetsil", without any real problems for the pronunciation.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic is considered to have had already the root that continued to be used by Hebrew, "*נ צ ל, N . TS . L" . For an identical root wih the meanings "to let drop, to pour" as well as "fell out, fell off", there is evidence from other Semitic languages, but for the meaning of "to save (oneself), escape" we do not have such information available.

     

    Referring to the Note on Hebrew it must be mentioned that the older root without initial " N ", naturally and probably was used in Proto-Semitic, with : "* צ ל ה, TS . L H (accentuated vowel) , tsalÓ".

 

Note:
  • English "to save" comes from Middle English "saven < salven", a loanword via the Normandic conquerors from older French "salver" that came from Latin "salvare". Modern French, already in formation at the time of William the Conqueror, out of "salvare" has made "sauver". This changing of an L that stands before another consonant into an U, only to create a diphthong , is a habit French shares with Dutch. Probably the Franks who also inhabited the southern parts of Holland , did this trick. The English originally took both versions, but then decided on "save".

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. The Latin words "salvare" and "salvus" have been linked to Sanscrit "sàrvas = entire, whole, all, every". It would be nice to follow this and registrate easily a hypothesis for Indo-European. But regretfully the combination of the two concepts, "entire, whole" and "all, every" about excludes that the basic message was related to "to save" or "to be undamaged". This is confirmed in the meanings of the many words based on the form "sarva", that do not get near to Latin "salvare, salvus" and "salvēre = to be healthy". This last word then has led to the very common greeting "salvē", still generally used in Italy, saying "be healthy".

     

    A comparable problem is seen with Greek "holos", that simply has the same kind of messages: "entire, all". True, it is also used to say "intact, safe and sane" but these are recognizedly derived meanings, that give no indication at all about the original root.

     

    Consequently we have to stay for now with the comparison between Semitic and Latin.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 14/11/2012 at 17.54.41