E 0623 NOSTALGY

The word " nostalgy " is based on Greek .

H 0657 ע ס נ

Concept of root : to travel, transport

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ע ס נ;

ע ס נ ו

nas‛;

nos‛

to travel

travelling

Related English words

nostalgy

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ע ס נ

ע ס נ ו

nas‛;

nos‛

to travel;

travelling

n . s (‛).

Greek

νοστέω

nosto

to return, go, come, arrive, travel

n (o) s t

Russian

перенос;

носить

perenos;

nositj

transport;

to carry, bear

n (o) s

English

nostalgy

nostalgy

n (o)s

 

 

Proto-Semitic *NAS ‛À --- *NŎS Indo-European

 

 

Once in a time we have to seek refuge into Russian in order to find a similarity between Indo-European and Hebrew we are looking for. In order to make the result a bit more eloquent we have added in Hebrew the participle, that uses the same vowel O we see in the Russian words.

 

The Greek word lies at the basis of the international word "nostalgy", that was unknown in classic Greek and has been invented.

 

Note:
  • English " nostalgy" consists of two elements, both Greek . The first is " nostos " = " return ", the second , "algia " indicates pain or suffering and is present as the second part of many English composed words . The word "nostalgia " did not exist in Classic Greek . It has been invented much later, as a translation of the German word " Heimweh ", that stands for " homesickness " .

 

Note:
  • Russian "perenos = transport" is composed of a prefix and of the root "NoS" that carries the message of transporting. "Nositj" is simply the infinitive form of the verb that says "to carry, bear", apparently with the end of transporting the thing one carries.

 

Note:
  • Hebrew. This same word was also used for the works of eradicating and carrying off that are necessary in agriculture. In modern language the basic form "nas‛" has been concentrated on "travelling", applying the causative form " ה ס י ע, his‛a " for "to transport", like defining this as "to make travel".

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. Proto-Semitic had this same root already, alternating in its application transitive and intransitive messages. It is found in a number of Semitic tongues. In Aramaic there is " נ ס ע , nes‛ = he moved". Akkadian "nisū = he removed". Cognates with "Z" instead of "S" are seen in Arabic "naza‛" and Ethiopian "naz‛a", that both say "he pulled out". Proto-Semitic probably had "* נ ס ע, N S Ayin".

 

Note:
  • Greek "nosto" indicates a number of deplacements that correspond largely to those of travelling, but does not have the concept of transportation as such in it. Among these meanings the specific one of "to return", has later acquired some extra weight. This has induced the Alsatian medical doctor Johannes Hofer in his thesis that dealt with the problem of homesickness, to invent and coin the word "nostalgia". He studied the nostalgy of Swiss men who so often left their home to serve in foreign armies. That is no more the case today, with the exception of the guards of the Vatican.

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. With just Greek and Russian we have not a wide basis of information, but the indication in iself is clear. A hypothesis of Indo_European "*N Ŏ S-" might be right.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 14/11/2012 at 11.15.57