E 0609 MYCOLOGY

The word " mycology " is of Greek origin .

H 0593 ק מ

Concept of root : mildew

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ק מ

moq;

maq

mould, mildew;

mouldy smell

Related English words

mycology

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ק מ

moq;

maq

mould, mildew;

(mouldy) smell

m (o) q

Greek

μυκης

mks

mould, mushroom

m () k

Latin

mucidus

mukidus

mouldy, mildewy

m (u) c

English

mycology

mycology

m (y) c

Danish

mug

mug

mould

m (u) g

Swedish

mögel; mugg (dial.)

mögel; mug

mould

m (u) g

 

 

Proto-Semitic *MOQ --- *MŪK- Indo-European

 

 

This similarity is nice and clean and little doubt surges about the common origin of these Indo-European and Hebrew words. "Moq" seems to be out of use in Modern Hebrew, but its sister "maq" carries on, with a changed message, that of "putrefaction, rottenness".

 

Note:
  • Greek once more has given a scientific word to about all of us : mycology. It is also rather well-known that moulds and mushrooms belong to one botanic family, even if their sizes vary greatly. Striking is the fact that the Greeks obviously already had established this fact.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic The root " מ ק, M . Q" or " מ ו ק , M W Q" of this entry has led to the formation of a couple of extended roots with identical or very similar meanings: " מ ק מ ק , M Q M Q" and " מ ק ק , M Q Q". This last one is also found in Aramaic " מ ק ק , meqaq = to rot, decay".

     

    Proto-Semitic probably had both the original "* מ ק , M . Q" and the newer "* מ ק ק ,M Q Q". In the comparison the vowel " O " is present.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic. The Germanic words of this entry are from North Germanic . There are forms with an extra consonant "L ", like in Old Norse and also Norwegian "mygla", besides "mugg". and Swedish "mögel". Old Danish temporarily absorbed the "G" and used "mul = mould". The mentioned "L" is ( part of ) a suffix. The word may well have existed in Proto-Germanic as "*M U GG-".

     

    It must be noted that in Germanic languages there are also partially similar roots for meanings comparable to that of "*MU GG-", such as of course English "mould" and German "muff = mould", that also lives in Neo Latin languages as in Italian "muffa".

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. On the basis of Greek and Germanic a hypothesis of "*M Ū K-" seems reasonable.

     

    It should be remarked that English "muggy" and"muck" should not be considered as related to the words of this entry, as their meanings are too different . The same goes for Latin "mucus" = "slime".

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 08/11/2012 at 10.20.07