E 0600 MORNING, TOMORROW

The words " morning " and " tomorrow " are of Germanic origin .

H 0577 ר ח מ

Concept of root : tomorrow

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ר ח מ

maghar

tomorrow

Related English words

morning, tomorrow

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ר ח מ

maghar

tomorrow

m gh r

German

morgen

morgen

tomorrow,

morning

m . r g

English

morning ;

tomorrow

morning ;

tomorrow

m . r

Old English

morgen, myrgen, mergen

morning

m . r g

Old Norse

morgin, myrgin, mergin

morgin,

myrgin,

mergin

morning

m . r g

Dutch

morgen

morghen

tomorrow, morning

m . r g

 

 

Proto-Semitic *MAGHAR --- *MŎRG-EN Proto-Germanic

 

 

If there is, as we suppose, a common origin, a metathesis exists of the R-sound and G/GH-sound between Germanic and Hebrew . Germanic has M R G/GH and Hebrew has M GH R. In both cases, Germanic and Hebrew, the meaning "tomorrow" is not exactly that of the next day, but also of "another day, in the future". If meanings are so identical and the composing consonants are the same, we may sometimes dare surmise a metathesis to explain a difference in sequence. As is known, the sound " R " has a tendency towards metathesis with other sounds. The final N in Germanic is in all probability a remainder of a declension-suffix.

 

 

Note:
  • Hebrew " מ" might make us think a moment that "maghar" is composed of the prefix M and the word " א ח ר , AGHAR ", thus saying "that what comes later". But that would not explain the absence of the א ( aleph) in "maghar".
    Besides it is not very specific about the "day after".

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic Proto-Semitic probably already used the same root "* מ ח ר, M GH R". that is present in Hebrew. It is also used in Aramaic and Syriac " מ ח ר , meghar".

 

Note:
  • Germanic languages do not always use the vowel O. In Middle Dutch we find "morghen, margen, maerghen, mergen". Generally it is supposed that the word "morgen" is based on an Indo-European root "*mer" meaning "to flicker" and used also to indicate "dim light". Well, the evidence is nearly inexistent and the words that are cited talk more about darkness than about light. The idea also forgets that "morning" decidedly not stood or stands for "dawn", but for the whole first part of the day. So we have to stick to the three consonant root "M R GH", related to Hebrew " M GH R ".

 

Note:
  • English. Old English "morgen" has been alterated in Middle English, becoming "morwen". This has been shortened into "morn", a word that is still used poetically, but that has been lengthened into "morning" through the influence of "evening". The other word "tomorrow", has been shaped from Old English "to morgenne", consisting of the preposition "to" and the dative of "morgen". Considering this one word and a more easy pronunciation did the job.

     

    The Old English word "morgen" for "morning" and "tomorrow", also found in various other tongues, is often seen as related to a word meaning "darkness", found in the Nordic languages as for example Danish "mörk. This is possible if an older common predecessor indicated "dawn" and "dusk", the phases between daylight and darkness. Later development then satisfied the demand for specific definition of the two main light and dark phases in 24 hours on earth.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic Generally, with as main exception the explained development of English out of Old English, old and new Germanic languages have the consonants "M", "RG"and "N". Between "M" and "RG" one finds most frequently the vowel"O", but also the related "" or "Y" as well as "E" . According to some scholars Gothic had "*maurg-", but others suppose "*morg-". The most probable vowel would be the "O" in a Proto-Germanic "*M O RG-". The final consonant "N" is considered, with the linking vowel that varies from "E" to "A" to "I", as a suffix, perhaps of a dative. A possible Proto-Germanic form is "*M O RG E N". The vowel "O" may well have been a proper Germanic development, with older forms having had "A" or "E".

     

 

Note:
  • Indo-European . Indications from other Indo-European groups about possible cognates are lacking and the comparison remains between Semitic and Germanic.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 06/11/2012 at 12.28.34