E 0528 LEAGUE

The word " league " has, via Italian and French, a Latin origin .

H 0548 ד ו כ ל , ד כ ל

Concept of root : to unite

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

; ד כ ל

ד ו כ ל

likkd;

likkud

to unite

union, league

Related English words

league , from French

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ד כ ל ;

ד ו כ ל

likkd ;

likkud

to unite ;

union, league

l . k . d

Latin

ligare

ligare

to tie, tie together,

to unite

l . g

Italian

lega

lega

union, league

l . g

French

ligue

lg

union, league

l . g

English

league

league

l . g

 

 

Proto-Semitic *LAKAD < *LAK- --- *LIG Latin < *LIG, *LAG Indo-European

 

 

We see a two-consonant root in Latin and a three-consonant root in Hebrew. Important is that both roots have led to nouns with the identical meaning of "union". But in the Latin branch this has been realized in a later stage. For that reason we have cited the Neo-Latin languages Italian and French.

 

Note:
  • Hebrew. The verb and noun, likkd and likkud, are intensive forms of a root "ל כ ד , L K D", that can be seen in entry GR 1207 (Hebrew 0547) with the meaning of "to take, occupy". Te message of "to unite" is visible in Modern Hebrew, but it has its solid basis in Biblical Hebrew "hitlakkd" that said : " to become united ".

     

    There is a root "ל ק ח , laqagh, L Q GH" that says "to take" and another, "ל ק ט , laqath, L Q TH" that says "to gather", with the form "ה ת ל ק ט , hitlaqqth = to get together".

     

    A very audacious supposition would be the following : the word pronounced "likkd", would in fact be very similar to the intensive form of the verb with the root "ל ק ט , liqqth, "L Q TH" . Thus the spoken word may have been judged to be the intensive form of "lakhad", being instead that of "laqath", with the consequent spelling. This remains hypothetical, but quite possible in linguistic development. All three the roots mentioned here refer to ways of "to take, to gather, to hold ", and all three have L as the first consonant and the sound of K or Q as second consonant. And in the intensive form of the verb the consonant " K " becomes " KK ", and does not change into " KH ". " K " and " Q " can be seen as of a common origin in very old language. And this is also where the similarity with Indo European comes forward.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. The basic form of the verb with this root, seen in entry GR 1207 (Hebrew 0547) was probably already present in Proto-Semitic: "*ל כ ד , L K D", besides the earlier "*L . K". In our comparison we specify a vowel " A ", but an " O " would be possible as well.

     

    But regarding the intensive form, with the meaning of " to unite ", we have no specific evidence. If the daring hypothesis explained in the above Note on Hebrew, would be right, this would be in harmony.

 

Note:
  • Latin. The brief root " L . G " indicates "to tie", but mostly with the messages of " to tie together" or " to tie to something". With that the further meaning "to unite" was a very logical development.

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. Besides Latin we have in Greek a verb "λυγοω, lügo'o = to tie strongly", obviously related to Latin. This is not changed by the fact that there is another couple of words, linked to each other with the meaning of flexing, that is "λυγος, lügos = wicker branch", and "λυγιζω, lügizo = to bend, fold, dominate".

     

    Sanscrit shows us a nasalized "linga = to attach oneself to; attachment ( of any kind)" and a not nasalized "laga = to adhere to, attach oneself to". This means that Indo-European may indeed have had the forms "*L I G-" and "*L A G-", related to Hebrew "likkd, lakad".

 

Note:
  • English "league" has come from French "ligue", via Middle English "ligg".

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 25/01/2013 at 17.31.30