E 0522 LANGUID

The word " languid " is, via Old French, of Lastin origin .

H 0541 ה ה ל

Concept of root : loss of strength

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ה ה ל

lah

to be(come) very tired

Related English words

languid, from Latin

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ה ה ל

lah

to be(come)

very tired

l . h .

Greek

λαγαρος

lagaros

weakened

l . g .

Latin

langueo

langwo

to be weak, tired

l . ng .

English

languid

languid

l . ng

 

 

Proto-Semitic *LAHÀ --- *LĂK- Indo-European

 

 

The similarity is rather obvious, if one takes into account that the H-sound in Hebrew here corresponds with the G-sound in Greek and Latin. Subsequently Latin has nasalized the root, that is it has inserted an N in front of the G . And Hebrew has doubled the consonant H, as it prefers to have three consonants in a root , to make better elaboration of forms possible .

 

One should not be misled by the existence of the Latin verb "laxare", which means "to loosen, let go". We find this verb again in English "to relax". It is quite possible that "laxo" and "langueo" have a common origin "*LAK/G, but their difference in meaning makes it improbable that one has been derived from the other.

 

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic We have no information useful for a hypothesis. The root is considered related to that of entry E 0526 (Hebrew 0528), which seems right. Then the origin might be the same Proto-Semitic root found in that entry : "*ל א ה , L Aleph H (accentuated vowel)", but probably without the Aleph : "*ל ה ה , L H H(accentuated vowel)" .

 

Note:
  • Indo-European . There are some indications for possible cognates.

     

    Celtic has Old Irish "lacc = weak, slack " and Middle Cymric "lacc = slack".

     

    Proto-Germanic. Germanic with Middle Dutch "lak = without force, languid, inert" gives an important contribution.

     

    As often, Germanic created a version with prefix " S ", as seen in English "slack" . Also in Middle Dutch there is this version, "slac". The meanings are hardly different, with an addition of "lack of diligence". There are sister words in other languages and Proto-Germanic probably had "*L Ă K-".

     

    Latin in "langueo" has a LAG-", but in "laxus" a "LAK-" and that may indicate the origin. A verb "*lanqueo" would not run smoothly in Latin and a change into "langueo" would be felt as natural. So we stick to "L Ă K" as the indication for Latin.

     

     

    Indo-European , with also Latin indicating "LAK-", may have had the same form "*L Ă K-", though "*L Ă G-" as in Greek can not be excluded now.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 03/11/2012 at 18.15.42