GD 1056áááááááá KIES

H 0516áááááááááá ש י כ ה

H 0516áááááááááá ס ס כ ;

Concept of root : to chew (intensely)

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ש י כ ה

ס ס כ

hikkish, *kash;

kasas

to chew

Related English words

none

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ש י כ ה

ס ס כ

hikkish;

kasas

to chew

k . sh ;

k . s . s <

*k . s

Middle Dutch

kesen, keesen;

kiese, kiesetant

kÚzen;

-

kýse, kýsetant

to chew;

-

molar tooth

-

k . s

Dutch

kies

kýs

molar

k . s

Old Saxon

kuse

molar

k . s

Russian

кусать

kusatj

to bite

k . s

 

 

Proto-Semitic *KAS- --- *KŪS- Indo-European

 

 

The Hebrew word "hikkish" is a composed verb on the basis of an old root of two consonants, "*K SH". Usually composed verbs beginning with "HI" are causative, but still rather often they stick to the meaning of the original briefer root. This should be the case also in this entry. This entry is related to number GD 1055 (Hebrew 0397).

 

 

Note:
  • Hebrew offers us two roots that are related to the first one of this entry. They are both based on an older root " כ ס ", that is still present in Aramaic with the basic meaning of "to chew", from "to nibble" to "to gnaw". The Hebrew roots we refer to represent the two most common ways of extending a Hebrew root of two consonants: doubling the second consonant has given " כ ס ס , kasas " that has been inserted in our table, and doubling both has led to " כ ס כ ס , kiskŔs ". Both mean "to gnaw, munch" but "kesissÓ" even says "chewing". This is all very near to the Dutch word "kies" for "molar".

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. Aramaic has "כ ס , kas" and "כ ס ס , kesas", both meaning "to chew". Arabic shows "ka'asha" with the related meaning "he ate" . Also with a related meaning, "fodder", there is in Akkadian "kissatu". This may well have been used in Proto-Semitic, certainly in the two consonant version "*כ ס , K S" and possible already as well in the three consonant version "*כ ס ס , K S S". But probably there existed the root with "SH" in "*כ ש ה , K SH H (accentuated vowel)".

 

Note:
  • Dutch and Proto-Germanic. This special word is not found in other Germanic languages and seems to be one of those old remainders from the time when the forebears of Germanic and Semitic, and especially of their Dutch and Hebrew branches, were nearer to each other than today. This makes a hypothesis for Proto-Germanic practically impossible for now.

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. There is not much further information . Old Russian had already the same root as modern Russian. A form "*K Ū S-" seems possible for Indo-European.

     

    Old Indian for "to chew, bite, eat" has "khādati" and a possible relation with this entry is hard to establish.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 02/11/2012 at 16.28.14