E 0465 HREAW

The Old English word "hraew" or "hraw" is of Germanic origin .

H 0404 ג ר ה

Concept of root : to kill, murder

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ג ר ה

harag

to kill, trucidate

Related English words

Old English: hraew

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ג ר ה

harag

to kill, trucidate

h r g

Dutch

reeuw

ruw

corpse

r . w

Old English

hraew , hraw

corpse

hr . w

 

 

Proto-Semitic *HARAG --- *HRĀW, *HRĒW- Proto-Germanic

 

 

The Germanic words of this entry are of very old stock. Our supposition is that Hebrew "H R G" corresponds with Germanic "HR W". It still is a rather long shot, but it is based on the supposition that "H R G" is related to other roots with "H + R" as the first two consonants. An example is " ה ר ס , H R S", that stands for "to destroy, demolish".

 

The mentioned Germanic words for "corpse" are often seen as linked to sister words of English "raw", but though there is a certain similarity in sound, we fail to see the semantic relation. The words outside Germanic that are called to testify are for example Latin "crudus" = "raw" and "cruor" = blood", Greek "kreas" = meat", Old Church Slavonic "krŭvĭ" = blood" and Old Indian "kravits" = "raw meat". The messages of "corpse" and "to kill" remain rather distant though and we can not use the cited words as basis for a hypothesis.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic. There is a number orf sister words in older Germanic languages. They have in common an initial HR. We name : Old Saxon and Old High German "hreo", Old Norse "hræ" and Old Frisian "hrē". Old English and Middle Dutch are shown in the Table. Proto-Germanic may have had "*HRĀW- and/or "*HRĒW-".

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. The root of this entry is also found in Moabite and Aramaic "ה ר ג, harag = "he killed". OS Arabic uses as well "ה ר ג, H R G" for "to kill". Then there is a cognate with "G" changed into "J" in Arabic "harj = murder ". Proto-Semitic probably already had in use the root we still find in Hebrew: "*ה ר ד, H . R . G".

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. Cognates in other Indo-European languages seem not be present and the comparison stays between Semitic and Germanic.

 

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 22/10/2012 at 17.54.06