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E 0359ááááááááá GARGLE , GORGE

The word " gargle " is of Germanic origin .

The word " gorge " is a loanword from Old French, with Latin source .

H 0382áááá áááááááááת ו ר ג ר ג , ן ו ר ג

Concept of root : throat

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ת ו ר ג ר ג , ן ו ר ג

garon, garәgәrot

throat

Related English words

gargle ; gorge

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ן ו ר ג

ת ו ר ג ר ג

garon, garәgәrot

throat

g . r;

g . r g . r

Greek

γαργαρος;

γαργαριζω

gargaros; gargarizo

throat;

to gargle

g . r g . r

Latin

gurgulio

gurgulio

throat

g . r g

Russian

горло

gorlo

throat

g . r l .

English

to gargle ;

gorge

to gargle ;

gorge

g . r g

French

gorge

gorzje

throat

g . r g

Dutch

gorgel

ghorghel

throat

g . r g

Old High German

querchela

querkhela

throat

q . r kh

 

 

Proto-Semitic *GAR --- *GĂR- Indo-European

 

 

This is a particularly interesting similarity, as we see the Greek game of doubling a syllable in the joy of expressing oneself, practised as well in Hebrew and Latin. But Russian has not followed this practice.

 

 

Note:
  • English participates here in two ways. First through " gorge " a loanword from Old French . And secondly with a word that does not indicate the throat as such, but a typical activity by the throat . Comparable verbs exist in other Germanic languages .

 

Note:
  • Latin and Russian have respectively U and O as the principal vowel. Latin also has various words with "gar" in them, but they are not with certainty related to this root, such as "garrio= to chatter " . Hebrew has a root "K R" in that field, for example the verb "karÓ" for "to speak out loud, talk". See entry E 0217 (Hebrew 0767).

 

Note:
  • Old High German is particularly interesting, because it shows that a root similar to the one of this entry was also Germanic, besides Hebrew, Greek, Latin and Slavic. New High German has "Gurgel", nearly the same as Dutch "gorgel", and these words are said to have been taken from Latin. More probable would be a Latin influence on an existing word .

 

Note:
  • Hebrew. Both words have a suffix that is common for the forming of a noun.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. As in more cases , an original root of two consonants, " G R " , while continuing its existence has developed also another root, "G R G R " through doubling itself. "G R N", a combination of the basic two consonant root "G R" plus a suffix "N", considered also as a three consonant root, is found in Hebrew, Aramaic, Akkadian and Arabic . "G R is to be seen besides in Hebrew, in Aramaic "ג ר ו נ א, garon'Ó". Akkadian has girā. Arabic changed the two "R"'s into "J"'s : "jarjar" in a common development. But it occurs also in Ugaritic and Tigrai. A third version, in which only the second consonant of " G R " has been doubled, resulting in " G R R", is present in Amharic and some minor tongues. The obvious conclusion is that Proto-Semitic had "*ג ר, G R".

 

Note:
  • Indo European is supposed to have had a root "*gar" meaning "to call, cry". To this root would be linked a.o. English "care", "charm" and "garrulous". We would like to distinguish between two roots as we see them in Hebrew: "G R" for "throat" and "Q R" for "to cry, call". We know very well that in the end , or better said at the beginning, the two may well have a common origin, as making sounds is done via the throat. But today the distinction seems simply practical for the further analysis of developments.

     

    We might also go further into the matter of another hypothetical Indo-European root , "*gwer" for "to swallow" and words for throat like Old Indian "gala-", Latin "gula" and Germanic "kela" with their offspring in newer (Old English "ceole") or modern languages (German "Kehle"). These all have an L instead of R. But we have found no directly related Hebrew roots. Only Hebrew "QoL" for "voice"or "sound" comes somewhat near, but it is akin to English "to call". See entry E 0138 (Hebrew 0785)

     

    Avestan has a similar word in "gar- = throat".

     

     

    Indo-European probably used the combination "G R" for the concept of "throat". The vowel may well have been an "A": "G Ā R-".

     

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 21/10/2012 at 17.07.32