E 0373 GLABROUS

 

The word “ glabrous “ is of Latin origin .

 

H 0356 ב ל ג

 

Concept of root : hairlessness

 

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ב ל ג

galav

barber

 

 

Related English words

glabrous

 

 

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ב ל ג

galav

barber

g . l . b

Latin

glaber, glabellus; glabro

-

glaber, glabellus;

glabro

-

hairless;

-

to make hairless

g l . b

English

glabrous

 

glabrous

g l . b

 

 

Proto-Semitic *GALAB --- *GLĀB-ER Latin < GLĀB- Indo-European

 

 

The R as the fourth consonant in Latin is a secondary extension to form a noun for the acting party. The verb seems to have been shaped after the noun. And there exists another word with only the three consonants G L B.: “glubo”, that says “to peel” and is not endlessly far away in message . See also entry E 0139 (Hebrew 0362).

 

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. This root is also found in Syriac "ג ל ב א , galaw' = razor, dagger" and in Aramaic "ג ל ב , gelav = he shaved; razor" . Akkadian has the word gallābu = barber". The root may well have been used already in Proto-Semitic "ג ל ב , G L B".

     

    The change of the pronunciation of the third consonant " B " into " V " hardly could have begun in Proto-Semitic, as the " B " is still present in other languages.

 

Note:
  • Latin. There is a supposition that Latin "glaber", in vulgar Latin becoming "glaberus" and then "glabrus", is a development out of a hypothetical "*ghlădh-ro-". But this seems quite wrong. It is intended to unite its origin with Germanic "*GL Ă D-", but that stands first of all for "smooth", whereas the basic meaning of "glaber" is that of "without hair". The two messages may coincide in many cases, but their origin is different and the ground they cover as well. The forming of composed words like "glabresco" confirms this. So Latin had "GL A B-" with a suffix "-ER", near to the professional result of the Semitic barber, the "gallabu" or "galav(galab)".

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. We have some information outside Latin to support a hypothesis "*GL Ā B-. Scholars have called to testify a rather similar Greek word " γλαφυρος , glaphüros = smooth, hairless" and this might seem convincing. Some then see as the basis of the root that of the verb " γλαφω , glapho = to excavate", which is really far away. More convincing is the fact that we have two similar roots, with also two different groups of secondary meanings. Secondary meanings of "glaphüros" are then : "hollow, deep" and "delicate, expert, smooth"

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 23/01/2013 at 17.35.28