E 0228 D A D

The word " dad " is of Indo European origin

H 0334 ד ו ד

Concept of root : beloved relative

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ד ו ד

dod

uncle, beloved one, lover

Related English words

dad

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ד ו ד

dod

uncle, beloved one, lover

d . d

Russian

дед;

деды;

дядя

djed;

djedә;

djadja

grandfather

forebears;

uncle

d . d

English

dad

dad, father

d . d

 

 

Proto-Semitic *DĀDÀ --- *DAD- Indo-European

 

 

Words for "relative", "uncle" and "friend" have been derived in language from roots indicating the belonging to a group or tribe. Hebrew, on the basis of this same root, has a word for friend: " י ד י ד, yadid. It is even quite possible that the actual root is related to "dor" in entry E 0265 (Hebrew 0338) .

 

 

Note:
  • English "dad", as seen from the similarity with Russian and Hebrew, is not just an example of children’s talk, as many believe. This kind of misunderstanding reigns high also regarding the words for father and mother. But nobody ever has explained why then "Pa" stands for father and "Ma" for mother. Neither has anyone made clear why "dad" would happen to mean "father" and not "mother" or still someone else ? It is sufficient to follow how any baby learns to speak to understand that so-called " baby-talk " is not at the basis of words.

 

Note:
  • Russian has the richest collection of words with this root, and it makes things clear. The root "D D" indicates important loved and/or close relatives in a tribe.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. Proto-Semitic, in a hypothesis based on a number of languages , may have had the word " *dad-" with the same meaning. Several Semitic languages have simply a root with " dad – " as in English . We see in Syriac and Aramaic in various versions the word ד ד א , dad' = uncle, beloved". Arabic "dād = foster-father". Akkadian "dādu = beloved child" is further off in specific meaning but remains in the realm of "belonging and beloved person". Proto-Semitic probably had already "*ד ד א , dad'"

 

Note:
  • Hebrew has more words for "people, tribe" that have given origin to words for "friend" as well as. See entries number E 0028 (Hebrew 0151) and E 0057 (Hebrew 0152). On the same root is based the Dutch word for "uncle" , which is "oom". And that word in Middle Dutch still stood for "grandfather, brother-in-law, companion" as well as for "uncle". This is an important indication for the way such words and meanings have developed. In Holland, at least in popular circles, it is still quite normal to have a good friend called "oom (uncle)" by one’s children.

 

Note:
  • English "uncle" is an abbreviated form of Latin "avunculus", meaning "mother’s brother", a diminutive of "avus" that stands for "grandfather, forebear" and is related to Hebrew "av". See entry E 663 (Hebrew 0001).

 

Note:
  • Indo-European The existing hypothesis is "*dhēdh-", based on Slavic "*dēdj" and Baltic "*dēd-". There are an Old Greek "tēthís = aunt" and "tēth = grandmother", that would indicate a possible Greek "*D Ē TH-" for "older relative".

     

    There is no reason to suppose that the pronunciation of the consonant " D " in Indo-European was a generalized " DH " or " TH ". Neither is a long vowel "E" here probable. So the hypothesis becomes D È D-, besides "*D Ā D-"

     

  • Related to these words may be the form "tata" and cognates. These are found in a.o. Old Indian "tâta = father", but generally used to address elders, superiors, children and pupils. The same word is found in Greek "τατα, tat = father", and "τεττα, tetta = father", but also in more general use to address older, respected people. There is also " τατι, tati = mother", but also used by slaves to address their owner. In the Balto-Slavic group there is Russian "тата , tata= father" with Russian Church Slavic "teti = aunt", Old Prussian "thetis = elder, father" and Lithuanian "tetis = father".

     

    It is simply not right to consider these words as children's talk as some do.

     

  • Related roots. It is possible that the words of this entry, used to indicate members of the family or in fact also tribe, are related to an important group of words in Indo-European languages that refer to "people" and that are represented in the German word for Germany: "Deutschland" and in the word "Dutch". Germanic languages generally have cognates of "deutsch". Other words are Old Irish "tuath = people", and its sisterwords Cymric "tud = land", Cornish "tus and Middle and New Breton "tut" and " tud". Lithuanian "tauta = land" and Oscan "touto" as well as Umbrian (acc.) "totam" stand for "community, the citizenship". An existing hypothesis for Proto-Germanic is "* deud-", but "*D U T-" might be more near the mark.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 17/10/2012 at 14.56.11