GD 1044 DUIST

H 0332 א ש ד

Concept of root : grassy growth

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

א ש ד

dash’;

desh’

to grow green;

grass

Related English words

none

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

א ש ד

dash’;

-

desh’

to grow green;

grass

d . sh .

Dutch

duist

d(ui)st

grassy growth

d . s

 

 

Proto-Semitic *DASHÀ --- *DUIS-T Dutch

 

 

A "small" and not too clear similarity. The Hebrew word can also be explained as "becoming covered with grassy growth". The noun "desh’" today is used for "lawn". In Dutch "duist", not a very common word, the final T is not a part of the root.

 

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic, in an existing hypothesized form, seems to contradict the impression that the comparison of this entry, between Hebrew and Dutch, has given. The supposed root we encounter is "*D . T", with a pronunciation "*dit-". The T as second consonant is also seen in Aramaic. But in Akkadian we have "dish-" and "dash-" , again with SH, with possibly related meanings. There are cases in which the consonants T and SH have interchanged in Semitic and we have no clear rules that cover the various alternatives. Just as a supposition, Hebrew seems to have changed sometimes an initial T into SH, without any clear rule . But the interchange of central , second or third consonants between SH and T e.o. may also have taken place in the opposite direction in Aramaic. Consequently Proto-Semitic may have had the same root as Hebrew, as is very frequently the case *ד ש א, D SH Aleph". This is uncertain for the time being.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic. There is very little information. In dialectal Dutch we find also the word "duistholt", a combination of "duist" and "holt = wood". It says "shrubs", those kinds of mixed small growth seen covering spontaneously woodland soil, below trees . Then there are not unsimilar words that indicate phenomena from the world of plants, but without giving clarity. A hypothesis for Proto-Germanic seems not feasible for lack of information.

 

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 17/10/2012 at 14.20.35