E 0107 BOOTH

The word " booth " is of Germanic origin .

H 0297 ת י ב

Concept of root : dwelling

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ת י ב

bait

house

Related English words

booth

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ת י ב

bait

house

b y t

Italian

baita

baita

small house in mountains

b i t

Old Danish

both

bot

dwelling

b . t

Middle Dutch

boede

bude

small house

b . d

English

booth

booth

b . th

Lituanian

butas

butas

house

b . t

 

 

Proto-Semitic *BŌT --- *BŌD Indo-European

 

 

It is surprising to find so many words related to Hebrew "bait" , a word that at first sight would seem far away from western "house" and "casa" . But in entry E 0463 (Hebrew 0456) we see that also these two Indo-European words have their kinship in Hebrew. A bit odd is though the fact that in Hebrew itself the word "baita" of this entry seems a lonely performer. That is, no verb or composed word from the same root is found .

 

 

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. The root is considered to be the same as in Hebrew. We see it in Aramaic "ב י ת א, beit'", Arabic"bayt" and Akkadian "bītu". It has cognates in Syriac "ב ת , bat" , Phoenician and Ugaritic, both with the root "ב ת , bat" . Proto-Semitic certainly had the two consonant root "*ב ת ", and may have had "*ב ו ת", with the "W" pronounced as a vowel "O, bōt".

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic. Besides the words in the above table there is modern German "Bude = hut, barrack, booth, room", that comes from Middle High German "buode", with Middle Low German "bōde". Old Norse has the word "byð" and Old Saxon "bōd-". For Proto-Germanic an initial consonant "B" and a final consonant "D" are probable. The fact that in Middle Dutch there are more variations, also with a final "T", does not change this. Dutch pronounces a final " D " clearly as " T ", and that influenced spelling. The vowel between the two consonants may have been either a long "O" or a long "U": "B Ō D-" or "B Ū D-

 

Note:
  • Greek. Greek has for "house" as the most common word " σ π ι τ ι, spiti " , that might give the impression, if the initial " S " as so often would be a neutral prefix, of a cognate of the words of this entry. But it is a shorter version of a loanword from Latin "hospitium", that has nothing to do with this entry.

 

Note:
  • Slavic. In Russian we find the word " б у д к а, budka = booth, watchhouse, sentry-box", which looks alike, but it may be related to " б у д и т ь, buditj = to wake, waken, rouse, call up". Polish has "budka" with the same meaning as Russian, but also "buda" with the same meanings as German "Bude", so that this "buda" seems a loanword from German, living together with the non-related but similar Slavic word "budka". But then again we see Polish "budowla, budynek = building" and the related verb "budowac = to build". In Czech a "building" is a "budova", "bouda = hut, stall, booth" and "budka = booth". For "to awake = probudit , as with Polish "budzič = to awake" we are together with Russian again. There may have been a Slavic "*B U D-" carrying the meanings of "to build" and "building".

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. Old Irish has "both = house" and Lituanian "butas = house". Together with Germanic and Slavic that points towards an Indo-European form "*B Ō D-" or "*B Ū D-" , but one should like to have some further support from other groups of languages.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 11/10/2012 at 17.17.43