E 0068ááááááááá BARE, PURE

The word "bare" is of Germanic, "pure" of Latin origin .

H 0260áááááááááá áר ב

Concept of root : pure

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ר ב

bor

pure, genuine

Related English words

ábare ; pure , from Latin

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ר ב

bor

pure

b . r

Latin

purus

purus

pure

p . r

English

bare ;

pure

bare;

pure

b . r

p . r

Dutch

baar

baar

pure

b . r

 

 

Proto-Semitic "*BOR --- *PUR Indo-European

 

 

The Classic Latin word "purus" has a P where Hebrew and Germanic have a B. This kind of shift between labials is just a frequent phenomenon. Entry E 0071 (H 0261) is in all probability related to the actual one.

 

 

Note:
  • Hebrew between the B and the R pronounces a vowel O, which is neither written ( a normal thing) nor indicated by a reading-help. But we find vowels that are relatives of this O both in Latin ( U in "purus" ) and in its daughter-words in English and Neo-Latin tongues. A few examples are "purism" , "purification" and "Puritan ".

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic "B . R" as a root is present in many Semitic languages, but with several different meanings, such as "son", "threshed grain, corn", "uncultivated fields, grounds", "exterior, outside" and the "pure, purity, cleanness" of this entry. Aramaic and Syriac "ב ר י ר א, berirÓ" and "ב ר י ר, berir" both say "purified" , Ugaritic "barr = to be pure", OS Arabic "ב ר ר stands for "to purify", Akkadian "barru" says "pure,purified". Probably also Ethiopian " berur = silver " is based on the same root . A root similar to Hebrew may be hypothesized for Proto-Semitic. This would be "*ב ו ר" , in which the "Waw" would have been pronounced as "O" or even "U": "*B O R" or "*B U R".

 

Note:
  • Latin "purus" in our opinion is not at all based on an Indo-European root for "fire", like some scholars seem to believe just because the Greek word "pur" (fýre) looks like it. Instead we find Latin "purare", of course meaning "to make pure" that is used both for cleaning with water and cleaning with fire. There is also "purgare < purigare" with the meaning of "to purify, to clean".

 

Note:
  • Dutch with the word "baar" seems to be the only Germanic language to have conserved the same meaning we find in the Hebrew word "bor". The difference is that it does not have the type of vowel of the group " O " and " U " based on or anyhow related to "W".

 

Note:
  • English. English-speakers know the difference between pure and bare, two words that have a common origin. Both are based on a message of "this and nothing else". Pure, received from Latin, tells that nothing else is within the object, like Hebrew "bor" and Dutch "baar". English "bare", like its sisters in German and Nordic, tells that nothing is with, upon or around the object . Regarding a person that concept is the one of nudity.

 

Note:
  • Origin. It is dutiful to refer that "bare" is usually considered to have been derived from an Indo-European root "*bhoso-s" = "naked". This seems to be based on Russian " босой , bosoj", saying "barefoot". We find this an insufficient base. The word is linked to "босва , boswa = bare sole of the foot". Nakedness as such is expressed by quite a different word : "роль , rolj", or also "нагота , nagota". This second word is related to English "naked". And, by the way, it also means "bareness". Odd to see that in Northern Italian dialect we find a word "nagotta" , meaning "nothing". Italian and certainly northern dialects, have many words of Germanic origin, due to the dominating presence for long periods of Longobards and also Goths.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic .In Germanic languages as in Semitic, a root "B . R", with in between a vowel "A", long or short, is used for many different meanings. The Dutch word "baar" also is used to express the concept of "naked, uncovered", though that basically was served by a word "bar" with a brief vowel "Ă". This makes it difficult to distinguish well which meanings were covered by Proto-Germanic "*B A R-, that certainly has existed.

 

Note:
  • Indo-European . On the basis of Latin and Germanic one may presume that for "pure" Indo-European used a two consonant combination "P . R", with probably a vowel " U " : "*P Ū R". That means that Germanic mostly abolished the " A " and also that we have no explanation why Old Indian lost the " R " as shown hereafter.

     

    Old Indian surprisingly does not have the third sound " R ". In various verbal forms like "pávate, pūnati" and others, it alternates "PU-" and "PAV-". The group of sounds that is also so well known in Hebrew and that is there expressed by the letter "WAW", comprises exchanged consonants (V; W; F) and vowels (O; U). In this case we see in Old Indian the vowel " U " in " PU- " and the consonant " V ", aided for pronunciation by a vowel " A " in " PAV ".

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 09/10/2012 at 15.14.26