E 0091 BĒTAN, BŌT

The Old English verb and noun " bētan " and " bōt " are of Germanic origin .

H 0235 ד ב

H 0235 א ד ב

Concept of root : fantasizing

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ד ב

א ד ב

bed ;

bad’a

oracle priest ;

to invent, fantasize, make up

Related English words

Old English : bētan , bōt

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

א ד ב

bad’a

to invent, fantasize, make up

b d .

Old English

bētan ;

-

bōt

-

-

to repair, make good;

reparation, good making

b . t

Middle Dutch

boeten

buten

to tell fortunes , do magic ;

to repair , make good

b . t

 

 

Proto-Semitic *BED'A --- *BOET- Middle Dutch

 

 

The Old English words of this entry as far as the evidence seems to go, do not carry the specific meaning we see in the above mentioned Hebrew word . Yet they have the same series of messages that is seen in Middle Dutch, with that sole exception of "fantasizing, doing magic". The Middle Dutch words "boeten" and the corresponding noun "boete" in these meanings have disappeared from modern language. A question mark remains of also Old English in the past carried that specific meaning of fortune telling etcetera that unites the other words of this entry .

 

Note:
  • Hebrew and Middle Dutch. Without wanting to lack in respectfulness to serious professionals, we daresay that fortune-telling is a form of fantasizing. And also that in the past many people realized that was so.

     

    Thus the two words may be considered as having an old common origin. Naturally each linguistic group then shapes its way of speaking and manages its own suffixes and, important, accents. In this way differences come about and grow. They grow to the point of making the common origin fully invisible. But in this case it can still be seen.

 

Note:
  • Middle Dutch. Seen the fact that the same ladies who tell fortunes, traditionally also may try to do miracles, the verb "boeten" has as well acquired the meaning of " to bewitch ".

 

Note:
  • Hebrew. Going back to old times, also among the Jews there were influential people that might predict fortunes, that what the Greeks then called "oracle". Such a person in Biblical times in Hebrew was called a " " ב ד, bed ". The root is certainly the same that has been extended into " bad’ " of this entry . This confirms the common origin with the Dutch word.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. This root is also found in Aramaic "ב ד א, B D Aleph, bed‛ = to invent, concoct" and with the different meaning of " to chatter" in OS Arabic. This is a narrow basis for a hypothesis for Proto-Semitic, but a "*ב ד א, B D Aleph", like bed‛ may have been in use.

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. In some Germanic languages a form "B OD/T-" is used to say "to announce", but that is not the same as "to fantasize" or "to tell fortunes". So outside Middle Dutch we have no information and in the comparison with Semitic we must limit ourselves to that.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 23/12/2012 at 14.52.56