E 1022††††††††† (TO) YEAN

The word (to) yean is of Germanic origin .

H 0085†††† ן ו א

Concept of root : procreate

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

ן ו א

on

to procreate

Related English words

yean, Old English eanian

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

ן ו א

on

to procreate

o n

English

yean

yean

to give birth

y n

Old English

eanian

to give birth

y n

Dutch

onen

onen

to give birth

o n

 

 

Hebrew *ON --- *ON- Proto-Germanic

 

 

This entry is strictly related to number E 1028 (Hebrew 0084).

 

The Germanic words are specifically used to indicate the giving of birth to lambs, but that specialization does not basically alter the fact of this similarity.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. A root or more roots "Aleph W N" with various meanings are found in Hebrew. It is probable that this root , given for the meaning of this entry as of uncertain origin, existed as such in Proto-Semitic: "* א ו ן , 'on " , but we have no evidence to prove this.

 

Note:
  • English "yean" is considered a contraction of Old English ge-ťanian. With this the meaning has not changed. And in Old English the "ge-" is a prefix, often of a confirming or intensifying character.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic. There is a hypothesis of "agwnon, but this seems to be caused by a wrong analysis of English "yean". An initial "Y" in English often has developed out of an earlier "G", and this is indeed the case here. But "yean" comes from Old English "ge-ean", that is a composed word, with a prefix "ge" and a basic verb "ean"- We see in Old English in fact also the more original verb "eanian". West Frisian has "eandje". In English still exists "eanling" = young lamb". We may note that "EA" often is a development from "O", as in "great". Comparing also with Swedish from Gotland, "ona = to be pregnant" we may conclude for Proto-Germanic on a probable "*O N-" . It seems wrong to insert in a hypothesis a G after an initial A, seemingly to get nearer to Latin "agnus".

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. There is a hypothesis of "*agwnon-, based on Latin "agn-us = lamb", seen as the typical example of the result of procreation. Then there is also Old Slavic "agne-", Old Irish "úan" and Welsh "oen", all meaning lamb. Greek for "lamb" has a word "αμνος, amnos, that is much less common then "αρνιον, arnion = lamb". "Amn-os" can hardly come from "arnion" and may be related to the other words, having received an " M " between the opening vowel and the " N " and changing the vowel to a more common initial " A "-sound. We tend to conmsider the "GN" in Latin "agnus" a later development. A hypothesis for Indo-European may be "*ON-" or also "*UN-".' that have led to a.o. "*awn-on", still without a " G ". Here the vowel " O " has become a consonant " W ", receiving the support of a vowel " A ".

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 21/12/2012 at 16.30.52