E 0062 AVID, TO WOO

The word "avid" is, via French, of Latin origin.

The word " woo " is of Germanic origin .

H 0080 א ו ה

;

ה ת א ו ה

Concept of root: desirable beauty

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

א ו ה ;

א ו ה ;

ה ת א ו ה

aww ;

iww;

hitaww

desire ;

to desire, crave for;

to desire, lust after, be avid

Related English words

to woo ; avid

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

א ו ה

א ו ה

-

ה ת א ו ה

-

aww ;

iww ;

-

hitaww

-

desire ;

to desire, crave for ;

to desire, lust after, be avid

a w .

Latin

avere

avre

to desire

a v e

Greek

*α₣ης

aws

*pleasing;

a v

English

to woo;

avid

to woo, avid

w o ;

a v .

Middle English

wowen

to woo,

try to gain

w o w

 

 

 

Proto-Semitic *AWA --- *AV Indo-European

 

 

The Hebrew verb is the intensive form, as found in Biblical Hebrew.

 

 

Note:
  • English in Middle English had "doubled" the "W", making a root "wow" out of "ow". And then English "to woo" has maintained the "wrong" part of the Middle English word. But the origin remains the same with Latin and Hebrew. We have no indications of related words in other Germanic languages.

     

    English "avid" comes simply from Latin "avidus", which gives an adjective to the person who is desiring.

 

Note:
  • Greek. This Greek root exists in the composed word "ενηης (ev's)" that was "*εν-αҒής (en-aws)" and means "pleasant, friendly, kind". Consequently the sense of the root was originally the same as of the identical Latin one.

     

    A word for "desire" on the basis of the same root is αιτης , aits.

     

    The concept of "pleasing", as referred to in the table, in Biblical Hebrew presumably was expressed by the passive form of the verb : " נ א ו ה , ne'ew, to be beautiful, graceful ".

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. The Hebrew verb of this entry seems rather isolated. Proto-Semitic may have had the same root, also seen the similarity with various Indo European languages, but we have no information available from other Semitic languages to allow a hypothesis.

 

Note:
  • Indo-European.

     

    Old Indian in a related root expresses the concept of "desire", but also the linkable or even consequent one of "to favour, satisfy" and "look after, help". Thus "ávati = to desire, favour". Then Avestan "avaiti-" with a certain shift says "to look after, help". The root is "A V-.

     

    Celtic has Cornish "aw-el = desire", that in Cymric "ew-yll" somewhat shifts the meaning to "wish, wanting". Celtic indicates "A W-.

     

    Armenian is very clear in "av-iun = libido".

     

    Greek aits, already shown in the above note, is considered to have been developed out of an original root A W -Y" for "desire".

     

    The information is quite sufficient to presume an Indo-European "A W-".

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 21/12/2012 at 16.23.56