E 0048ááááááááá ARK

The word "ark" is of Germanic origin

H 0065ááááááááá א ר ג ז

Concept of root: chest

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

א ר ג ז

argaz

container, chest

Related English words

ark

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

א ר ג ז

argaz

container , chest

a r . g áz

English

ark

ark

a r k

Old English

arc

ark

a r c

Greek

αρκεω

arkeo

protect

a r k .

Latin

arca

arca

chest, closet

a r c

 

 

Proto-Semitic *ARG(AZ) --- *ARK- Indo-European

 

 

As shown below, the combination of A + R as a root in Hebrew also indicates the concept of " to collect ". Probably in the various above mentioned languages the consonant "G" or "C" or "K" after the original root "AR" indicates that the collected things are put away in a container or chest and thus protected . We see this both in "arca" and in "argaz".

 

Note:
  • Hebrew Here we see also the more basic verb " א ר ה , (arÓ) ", saying "to collect" and the noun " א ר ו ן , (aron)" or "chest, closet". This is where collected things are put away. It has been shaped normally as a noun from "to collect" without adding a "G". Yet it coincides with the concept of Latin "arca" or "chest".

     

    So we find in Hebrew two different nouns for a chest or container , one shaped with the suffix "-on" that is identical to the common Greek suffix "-on" for neutral nouns, and the other with a guttural like the other languages. But in this case also a Z is added, for which we have no specific explanation .

     

    Some scholars see a possible origin in a root "R G Z", but the meanings carried by such roots are " excitement, agitation" and "quivering, trembling, as well as "bad temper, ire", all too far away from the meanings of "argaz".

 

Note:
  • Aron is the original Biblical name for the Ark of the covenant that once held the stone tablets with the Ten Commandments.

     

    Today it is still used to indicate the closet in the Synagogue that keeps the scrolls.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. The root "Aleph R G Z" is also found in related words in Aramaic, that is identical to Hebrew, as well as in Syriac . It may already have been present as such in Proto-Semitic, but this remains uncertain. Proto-Semitic possibly already used this root "א ר ג ז *, Aleph R G Z".

     

    But such a long root should have a shorter one as predecessor. If not "R G Z " one may consider the possibility of "*א ר ג *, Aleph R G ", though regretfully we have no documentation for that.

     

 

Note:
  • Latin. The common theory is that "arca" is built on the same root a the verb "arcēo, arcēre ", that stands for "to lock in, keep closed", and also "to keep at bay, ward off". This means an indication of "A R C-". Latin "arceo" is a sister word of Greek "arkeo", seen in our table.

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic. A number of older words from Germanic languages are considered as having been loaned from Latin "arca". There are Old High German "arahha = chest, closet", Old Norse "erkr, arkir, ork = chest, ship" and Old English "ear, earce = chest, coffer, box" besides a more probable loanword under influence of the Bible, arc = ark, chest". Then there is the very Latin sounding Gothic "arka", that may even have substituted an original Gothic sounding Germanic word that we will not try to invent. The picture is too varied and Proto-Germanic may well have used for "chest, box" an own word .

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. On the basis of this information an Indo-European "*A R K-" may have been in use.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 26/09/2012 at 10.39.44