E 0008 AEDM

"Aedm" is an Old English word of Germanic origin

H 0009 א ד ם

Concept of root : breathing, man

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

א ד ם

adam

man

Related English words

Old English : dm = breath

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

א ד ם

adam

man

a d . m

Old Indian

atman

atman

breath,

soul

a t . m

Old Saxon

athum, athom

athum; athom

breath,

ghost; breath, soul

a t . m

Old English

ædm

breath,

a d . m

Old High German

adhmot, atum

adhmot, atum

breath,

a d . m,

a t . m

Middle High German

atem, aten, adem

atem, aten, adem

breath, ghost, vital strength

a t . m

a d . m

German

Atem

atem

breath

a t. m

Dutch

adem

adem

breath

a d .m

Middle Dutch

adaem

adām

breath

a d . m

 

 

Proto-Semitic *ADAM --- *ADAM Indo-European

 

 

Breathing and having a soul are among the most basic elements of existing as a human being . Genesis is very clear . This makes it understandable that one and the same root has been chosen in various languages to express these concepts. In Hebrew with its exactness and down to earth thinking the root says the essential , "man". In Old Indian with its spirituality "soul " could easily prevail.
In Germanic instead with its cultural tendency to link humans with their spirits , "breath" and "ghost" have come out on top.

 

This entry is related to E 0111 (Hebrew 0010). The usual view is that the word "adam" has been derived from "adam", that says " soil, earth ". Such a kind of development may be natural in modern European usage of shortening words, but the normal way would have been to shape "adam" , which as Genesis explains is the soil man has to work, by adding the suffix "" to "adam", the word for "man". Genesis then says that God shaped man out of dust from the soil, with what might seem like a slightly anachronistic use of the word, unless one reads the meaning of "adama" (also) as the "soil fit for creating adam" from it.

 

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic is seen as having had the root "Aleph D M" that is still used in Hebrew : א ד ם .

 

Note:
  • Hebrew and Middle Dutch are identical in sound !

 

Note:
  • English no more uses this word and has concentrated on " breath " that is a development of another Old English word, "brth", that stood for "exhalation" . In Middle English the meaning of " air from the lungs" was added to the original one .

 

Note:
  • Dutch has also the word "asem" with the same meaning of breath. This is often considered just an alteration of "adem". This might be true but has no certain basis. The odd thing is that "to breathe" in Hebrew says "nasham", as is seen in entry E 0622 (Hebrew 0659). Hebrew often has used the N as a prefix and if that would be the case here as well, "asem" might seem related to that different Hebrew root !

 

Note:
  • Proto-Germanic. German has changed the "D" into "T", but with much hesitation during Old and Middle High German. Old Saxon "TH" is a non uncommon and later very English development out of a "D". The probable Proto-Germanic form is "*A D e M".

 

Note:
  • Indo-European. Proto-Germanic "ADeM = breath, soul" with Old Indian and Sanscrit "atman = breath, soul, life, body" and "atma = oneself, one's nature, one's essence" must have had a common origin . The probable Indo-European form is "*A D A M".

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 22/09/2012 at 17.36.30