E 0298 EPHEBE

The word "ephebe" has, via Latin, come from Greek

H 0007 א ב י ר , א ב ר ך

Concept of root : power of youth

Hebrew word

pronunciation

English meanings

א ב י ר ;

א ב י ר ;

א ב ר ך

awir ;

abbir ;

avrekh

Strong (G.d);

powerful;

young man

Related English words

ephebe, from Greek

Comparison between European words and Hebrew

Languages

Words

Pronunciation

English meanings

Similarity in roots

Hebrew

א ב י ר

א ב י ר

א ב ר ך

awir;

abbir;

avrekh

strong(G.d);

powerful;

young man

a b i r

Greek

ήβη

hb

vigor, youth

b

English

ephebe

ephebe

(. ph) . b .

 

 

Proto-Semitic *ABBER --- *HÈBÈ, HABA Greek

 

 

Both Greek and Hebrew bear in these roots the meaning of youthful power and vigor. But if there is a common origin, the separation must have taken place before Hebrew added a third consonant, the "R". This is uncertain .

 

In this case we see the initial Aleph in Semitic correspond with aGreek or Indo-European " H ", which is not too uncommon.

 

 

Note:
  • In Modern Greek the word "ήβη" has its meaning developed into "adolescence". The pronunciation has become " iwi ".

 

Note:
  • Greek dialects have for "hb" also "hba" and " haba ". This proves that also in Greek the use of vowels may vary without influence on the meaning of a word and its root.

 

Note:
  • Hebrew gives further clear indications for the supposition that the combination of the two consonants Aleph and Bet already deals with vigor and youth.
    We can find this in the words א ב = av" for "father" and א ב = ev " for "young plant". The extended root with an R as third consonant then represents a necessary diversification, combining vigor and youth . And an א ב ר , ewer, ewar " is an organ or member. Ans specifically the male one. Hebrew uses "abbir" also as a noun to say "stallion" and "bull".

 

Note:
  • Proto-Semitic. The similarity with Akkadian "abaru" for "to be strong" allows a hypothesis for a Proto-Semitic root similar to Hebrew: א ב ר . In the comparison the vowels " A " and " E " are seen, that may have been used in Proto-Semitic.

 

Note:
  • English "ephebe" comes from Greek "εφ’ήβής , eph’ hbs", litterally "in youth", that indicated especially young men of about 18 to 20 years old.

 

Note:
  • Indo-European We have no information from outside Greek that would allow a hypothesis for Indo-European different from Greek.

 

 

 

 

 
Created: Tuesday 6 November 2007 at 22.30.54 Updated: 21/12/2012 at 9.58.11